Mind

REFUEL YOUR MIND

Caring for your body is more important than ever. Here’s how to honor your body’s needs while cooped up.


  • Join Kimberlé Crenshaw, a civil rights advocate and a leading scholar of critical race theory, to learn why intersectionality matters.
  • If you want to avoid traveling this summer, unplug from work with a restful, at-home vacation. ☀️
  • Educate yourself on the African American experience in the U.S. by engaging in Yale’s free class
  • It’s easy to feel overextended. NPR’s Life Kit teaches us how to prioritize our needs while being present for others. 🤗
  • How do we take care of our mental well-being? Coa offers a free, supportive community with online therapist-led groups for anxiety, stress, and connection. 
  • Time is of the essence. Thrive Global helps us work mindfully at home with distractions.
  • How do we meaningfully gather in times of distancing? Together Apart by the NY Times helps us stay resilient and connected.
  • Music soothes the mind — so get creative and make your own with Chrome Music Lab. 🎹
  • In the face of crisis, it’s easy to get lost in the uncertainty. Practice gratitude with these 6 simple exercises🙏
  • Journal away with reflective prompts by our favorite Insta therapist — writing might help you stay present. 📝  
  • Watch something uplifting — we loved this cute NYC story of finding love during the Coronavirus outbreak.  
  • Learn the meaning of true human connection on Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday podcast episode with Brené Brown. 
  • We used to want to laze around at home all day… until we had to. Here are our favorite dos and don’ts for the indoor lifestyle.
  • Social media can pull you down a rabbit hole of anxiety, but this page always reassures us of the best in people. Check out this impromptu Mallorca dance party: quarantine edition. 💃🏼🎸
  • We love movie nights — laughing with friends and letting our minds detox — but we don’t have to miss them. Host a virtual Netflix watch party with your friends (we’re currently binging Love is Blind 📺)
  • Worried about money? Stay proactive and protect your financial wellbeing with this handy guide. 💸

Body

HONOR YOUR BODY

Caring for your body is more important than ever. Here’s how to honor your body’s needs while cooped up.


  • Need a weekend getaway from the city? Hop on a bike for some beautiful riding 🚴‍♂️
  • Change your scenery and take an adventure to new NYC drive-ins where you can enjoy the summer weather with a classic flick.
  • Summer is the best time to load up on fresh fruits and veggies 🍉🥑🌶 Level up during your next grocery store run by learning how to pick the tastiest ones!
  • Local issues are more important than ever. Learn about your candidates and exercise your right to vote. In person or via absentee ballot, every voice counts. 🗳
  • Tune in to the Food Heaven Podcast for an inclusive, expert take on intuitive eating and body respect.
  • Stay updated to join local protests happening everyday in the city by following this IG account.
  • If you have been sitting all day, stretch it out before going to bed for some good zzz’s. 😴
  • Love on lockdown? NY Times shares helpful ideas to stay connected with bae. 💌
  • You deserve a spa day. Pamper your skin with whipped up ingredients in your kitchen. 🌝
  • For some of us, we’re hunched all day on the computer. We’ve got ways to keep your head up.
  • Trouble sleeping? Relax your body before bed with a calming guided meditation by our favorite app, Headspace💤
  • Break a sweat and get in cardio with some awesome HITT classes on the Peloton App. Sign up by April 30 for a free 90-day trial! 
  • Manage your screen time by using a focus-timer app that eases your eyes and also lets you contribute to the environment.  🌳
  • Give your body a stretch with NYC Yoga to the People’s new live-steam classes. Fam, it’s donation-based 🙂
  • Restless while working from home? CorePower Yoga can help you find some zen through their on-demand platform. 🤸
  • Or take that restlessness and shake it out with some virtual 305 Fitness classes. They’re also offering a series of wellness workshops on building a nutritious relationship with your body.
  • In a city that never sleeps… there’s no time like the present to finally get some quality zzz’s to build up your immunity.
  • It’s easy to feel unprepared when it comes to grocery shopping and meal prepping right now, but worry not. Here are 25 easy and cheap recipes you can whip up from pantry staples! 🍳
  • Love (is still possible) in the time of coronavirus. Check out WSJ’s podcast episode on how people are using tech to connect to bae.

Soul

SOOTHE YOUR SOUL

Share your love for humanity. We’ve got ways to interconnect with other beings in our local community.


  • Yes, election day is in November. But don’t wait until the last minuterequest a mail-in-ballot now to ensure you’re registered in time.
  • Pledge a donation to Black Girls Breathing — a space for Black womxn to manage their mental health through meditation breathwork. 🧘🏿‍♀️
  • Contribute to the Loveland Foundation and help connect Black women and girls to high-quality mental health services.
  • Donate across 70+ bail out funds and racial justice organizers through ActBlue.
  • Participate in Time Out’s pledge to support local food, culture, and entertainment in the city. 
  • Need a good read? You can browse titles and support local indie bookshops. 📚
  • Virtually check in on an elderly neighbor with Good Old Lower East Side. Just sign up here!
  • There’s this cool t-shirt. Buy it and 100% of the profits go to local restaurant partners. 🙌
  • Help sew face masks for frontline workers in the NYC area hospitals, clinics, food banks. If you can’t sew, there are plenty of other ways to volunteer! 😷
  • Show love for your Brooklyn neighbors (whether or not you live in the borough) by supporting an urgently-needed mutual aid fund for Crown Heights and Flatbush residents.
  • Keep families in their homes by contributing to an emergency rental assistance fund. All funds will be deployed directly to help renters impacted by COVID-19.
  • Support your local NYC bodegas by downloading this handy app and on-demand order groceries from your apartment. 📦
  • Not all heroes wear capes — right now, many are saving lives in lab coats and scrubs. Write a note of gratitude for healthcare champions in this national collective card. 🌟
  • Help your local businesses (from Boba Guys to House of Yes) survive by investing in their futurebuy a gift card to enjoy once this is all over!
  • Keep the music (venues) alive. Tune into virtual live DJ sets with Nowadays, every night, from 8PM to midnight. 🎶

WHAT WILL YOU CREATE? 💎


They say there’s something for everyone in NYC. But despite the seemingly endless array of possibilities, there are still empty spaces that not everyone else may spot.

In a city that has almost everything, what do you do when you notice one?

You fill it. You bring into this world whatever you feel is missing. You can create the change that you yearn for.

Why me? You may ask. Why not you? You’re just as capable and resilient as anyone else. Maybe more. (After all, you’re a New Yorker). 

A year ago, we asked ourselves the same questions. A year later, we’re proud to share our anniversary issue with you.

Whether you’ve just subscribed or have been following us since our debut, thank you for being a part of our community. 

Whatever struggles you’re facing or dreams you’re dreaming, we’ll continue to be here to listen, guide, and cheer you on, every single step of the way. ❤️

All our love, 
Your 20s to be team

P.S.: Wanna have a say in our upcoming issues? Fill out our feedback survey!

GETTING REAL

“Even before I was 15, I remember men whispering at me and my friends in cars. I didn’t feel like there was a good way to respond to it. I felt silenced by these comments — I’d just keep walking. As a freshman in college, I was given an assignment to immerse myself in something and then document it in on social media. The project, Catcalls of NYC, gave me the opportunity to respond to catcalling in a different way.”
Sophie, 22, on learning how to be unapologetic and tackling sexual harassment on NYC streets.


“I moved to New York from London in September 2016, where I witnessed how everything in America was changing politically. At the time I came to the city, I was continuing my acting career and going from one audition to another. It was such a tough process. I finally decided that if it wasn’t going to happen, I was going to make it happen. A combination of being someone new in the city pursuing theater and the political climate ignited a fire in me to write about it.”
Sammi, 29, on using comedy to navigate moving to NYC and showcasing the battle over women’s bodies.


GETTING BY

  • Wanna make a difference with your workout? Next week is UNGA and NYC’s inaugural “Walk the Talk,” a celebration of universal health care and well-being. Join the walk/run to raise awareness! 🏃
  • NYC meals are $$$$… even when you’re cooking for yourself. Here are our go-to tips for stretching your grocery budget.
  • Our least favorite kind of politics? Office politics — especially tricky when you’re one of the youngest around the water cooler. Here are some real-world situations and solutions.
  • ☀️Giveaway Alert ☀️ Ray is a fast-growing mobile app that makes it simple to send digital collective cards. It’s hands-down the easiest way to celebrate someone. We’ve got exclusive Ray swag that’ll brighten your heart. Check out our Insta to enter the giveaway!

BEEN THERE

New York changes fast, so don’t miss out on its treasured traditions just because you’re a local. The 93rd Feast of San Gennaro is happening this week, which means Mulberry Street is jam-packed with meatballs, cannoli, and cheesy tourist traps. Grab a bite and enjoy the madness!

DONE THAT

For this round, you asked: How do you respond to change?

Our favorite piece of advice was from Álvaro, who said,

When facing a dramatic change in your life, try to really look at the positive outcomes. They might not be so obvious at first, but try hard enough and you’ll find something there.
New situations, as scary as they are, can often lead to a lot of personal growth and learning opportunities, merely by being handled with a “can do” attitude — even if you have to fake it til you make it.
Not everything will change all at once, so you can be grounded and find comfort even in the smallest of things that have remained the same. And in case you’re really freaking out, just take a breath and live one day at a time. Soon the changes will become everyday life.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

Catcalls of NYC street art

CAT-CALLING IT OUT


Growing up in New York City, I’ve been dealing with catcalling for a long time. Even before I was 15, I remember men whispering at me and my friends in cars. I didn’t feel like there was a good way to respond to it. I felt silenced by these comments — I’d just keep walking. I forced myself to believe it was OK for someone to call out, “Hey, beautiful” on the streets even though I felt uncomfortable.

As a freshman in college, I was given an assignment to immerse myself in something and then document it in on social media. The project, Catcalls of NYC, gave me the opportunity to respond to catcalling in a different way.

I came up with the idea to actually chalk the words of catcallers on sidewalks and post them on Instagram, creating a collage of different catcalls. The most troubling part of catcalling is that people say they’re just words, or that it’s a compliment. I wanted to take those actual words and show people it’s not just words — they have a really big impact when you’re walking down the street.

At first I was writing about my own and my friends’ experiences. Slowly, people would find my account and message me their experiences to write down on the streets of NYC. Right after the #MeToo movement in December 2017, my account went viral and grew from 900 to 10,000 followers overnight. It’s then that I realized a lot of people care about this and a lot of people need to share their story.

Catcalls of NYC has become such a huge part of my identity. It’s made me grow to be really unapologetic in condemning all forms of harassment and discrimination in the public space. I found the power to say “I don’t feel OK with that.”

It’s unbelievable to see the plethora of stories people open up about. They are looking to be believed and to be heard. If you’re an empathetic person, you’re reading their stories and trying to respond in a way that makes them feel supported — but it’s hard to read more than one story at a time and set boundaries. I’ve learned to cope by taking breaks, as well as by assembling a team to build this community and continue the conversation online and offline.

I’ve found that a great place for dialogue, especially in NYC, is on the street. When you’re chalking, a lot of people stop to see what you’re writing and to talk to you. It’s something special because normally nobody ever stops for anything here. It’s important to build community, but it’s a rare thing since people in NYC don’t often talk to each other.

A few days ago, I talked to a guy who mentioned how he used to catcall with his friend. They were practicing how to flirt, and it was a way for them to bond. He thought seeing the words chalked on the street was disgusting, and never wanted people to go around saying those things.

Having conversation is such an important tool both on social media and also on our streets. If someone is genuinely asking, “Sorry, I don’t understand, I would’ve thought this was a compliment, but please explain,” that’s where the change can come from too. I’m learning how to engage allies who have room to change and grow. Before, I was so strong in believing, “Well this is harassment, you should understand it immediately.” But we don’t talk enough to those people who are maybe somewhere in the middle and learning. In the end, we are all learning.

The Handmaid's Musical actors on stage

IGNITING THE FIRE


I moved to New York from London in September 2016, where I witnessed how everything in America was changing politically. It was a scary reality to see the way women were treated in a different country. It didn’t necessarily have to translate into actions — it was the way women were being talked about, like they were objects and their bodies were under scrutiny. Everything was ultimately dictated by a man’s opinion.

At the time I came to the city, I was continuing my acting career and going from one audition to another. It was such a tough process. I finally decided that if it wasn’t going to happen, I was going to make it happen. A combination of being someone new in the city pursuing theater and the political climate inspired me to write.

Being a big fan of the book and the TV show The Handmaid’s Tale, I realized I wanted to adapt a musical parody of the story that paralleled with the reality of present day. Though the TV show is about a dystopian America, everything in the book is relevant to something happening at some point in some part of our world.

It almost makes sense to laugh it off, but also create a line of communication where people can be inspired to do something about it. That is why much of the show relies on dark humor and black comedy. In fact, the Little Mermaid’s “Poor Unfortunate Souls” song was the first piece that inspired me to create the show.

I hadn’t ever written a show, but I found comedy to be a way to deal with the most difficult situations. Stress is always handled in a flight or fight mode. I remember when I was growing up my mom told me that “when life throws you lemons, you gotta deal with it because it doesn’t stop.” I don’t know if it’s the healthiest approach, but you need to learn to make the time.

I have been juggling a lot — it came down to time management and priorities. The last three months, I needed to focus on renewing my visa and getting back into the country. The uncertainty of not knowing where I would be was stressful, and my mental being needed to cope with getting back to NYC. In the process, I learned how to delegate and the importance of having a team.

Living in our 20s is an interesting ride. There are always highs and lows, but that’s what makes it even more real. This experience has opened my eyes to the world. We can all get stuck in what we know and what we are comfortable with — it’s rejuvenating creating a space and a voice that can kickstart change.

There is a fire burning inside of me. Maybe it has always been there, but now it’s ignited.

CAN’T WE JUST TALK? 👋


Let’s dish it out.

Despite the popular saying, talk ain’t cheap. The ability to express yourself and fully communicate your feelings, desires, and boundaries, is one of the most important skills you’ll hone in your 20s. 

From telling your partner what you need, to asking for new opportunities at work, to breaking a difficult truth to a friend, communication is never as easy as we think. Often we get stuck in the gaps between what we say vs. what we mean and what someone else says vs. what we hear. 

There will always be gaps, but the effort you put into bridging them is what counts — whether you’ve been doing it for ages or are just starting today. 

We hear you,
20s to be team

GETTING REAL

“This is the healthiest, most vocal relationship I’ve had, and it definitely started out the hardest simply because we were so worried about doing everything right. Honestly at first, it did not feel natural to constantly be so open and vulnerable. But I think that’s what geared us up to have a very “unnatural” talk about finances.”
Ellie*, 24, on kicking off a healthy financial journey with your partner.


“When I first moved to Venice a year ago for a short-term job opportunity, my partner, Denise*, and I had been dating for almost four years and had just moved in together. Scheduling quality time for each other and learning to be open with our pet peeves helped us when we went long-distance.  We needed to come to a certain medium since we were both living in a shared space. Even if it’s small and random like “stop taking my pillows” or “don’t leave the toothbrush there!”
Eric*, 24,  on going the distance and learning how to live with his partner thousands of miles away.


GETTING BY

  • What do you do when the rent is just too damn high?  Try your luck with NY’s list of affordable housing lotteries in NYC. 
  • Before you hit send on that work email, check out these small changes you can make to your language to sound even more confident! ✍️
  • End of summer often means a change in setting for many NYCers. For those of you moving in with significant others, here are some tips and tricks to be both #CoupleGoals and #RoommateGoals.
  • Practice makes perfect: even space landings require dress rehearsals! Check out Gimlet media’s new podcast: The Habitat, on the fascinating true story of six volunteers picked to live on a fake planet — imitation Mars — to help model the next NASA mission. ☄️

BEEN THERE

New York changes fast, so don’t miss out on its treasured traditions just because you’re a local. The 93rd Feast of San Gennaro is happening this week, which means Mulberry Street is jam-packed with meatballs, cannoli, and cheesy tourist traps. Grab a bite and enjoy the madness!

DONE THAT

For this round, you asked: What’s the best money you’ve spent this summer? 

Ali tells us,

Investing in my education and completing an online certification course from Cornell.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

A city road sunset

LOVING WITH NO BOUNDARIES


I’ve experienced both sides of being in a long-distance relationship living in and out of New York City. Leaving and returning to the city has definitely made me appreciate it in a different way, but it also taught me how to be more honest and communicative in my relationship.

When I first moved to Venice a year ago for a short-term job opportunity, my partner, Denise*, and I had been dating for almost four years and had just moved in together. We met during our last years in college in NYC and since Denise had been in investment banking for two years and two years in private equity, the time we’d always had together was limited. Typically, we chatted for half an hour before bed and hung out on the weekends. Realistically, she’d have to work on many projects during the weekend, so it was mostly Saturday night or part of Sundays.

When we started living together, it was really nice to see each other more. But, after a while, we realized we were no longer spending quality time together. We had to start scheduling dates to really catch up. I always thought when you start living with someone, you’d spend more personal time with them. Yet, it is easy to take the relationship for granted since that person is always present. Scheduling quality time for each other really helped us communicate and build the foundation for when we went long-distance. It’s not like we didn’t care for each other, but more so we needed to be open in managing realistic expectations given our different schedules.

We also learned that we needed to be open with our pet peeves. In the beginning of a relationship, you don’t want to bring certain things up. You try to be easy going. Over time, you either blow up or you learn to talk about. There are times we blew up and now we learn to talk about it before it gets to that point. We needed to come to a certain medium since we are both living in a shared space. Even if it’s small and random like “stop taking my pillows” or “don’t leave the toothbrush there!”

When I first moved to Italy a year ago, it was really sad. But, what made it easy was Denise visiting me the first month and then again the second. The times she stayed were also really long both during the holidays. Spending those long amounts of quality time never really made me feel like we were never apart. And when I returned back to NYC, we resumed the cadence of scheduling date nights and making time for each other.

Now, Denise has moved abroad for grad school and it has been tough. Yet, we still manage to keep in touch with Whatsapp and Google Voice. We try our best to be mindful of each other’s schedules given the six-hour time difference. Normally, I wake up at 6 AM and go to bed at 10 PM. So, I’ll do a half run in the morning, come home, shower, catch her on the phone, but then go to work. We occasionally message during the day but we understand it is hard since I’m working full-time and she’s settling in a new city.

Now being on the other side of the long-distance relationship, I can empathize more of how Denise felt when I first left NYC. I remember the first time I slept in our bed there was all this empty space and it felt odd. When I told her how I felt, she mentioned that’s how she felt the first night I wasn’t there. I never realized what she was experiencing when I moved to Italy since my first night there was a flood and all I could think about was how to carry my luggage in knee deep water when Venice flooded the first night I was there.

My mind was pre-occupied with a lot and it was a distraction to feeling lonely. Being back in New York has helped me be more thankful to my friend group and support system to get me through this period. Being able to count on a group of people who’ve known you for 7+ years is truly invaluable. I also realize what it takes to be communicative in a relationship being on both sides of the distance.

*Name changed to protect privacy.

A green neon heart with dollar bills inside

TALKING MONEY WITH LOVE


Going into the relationship, I think we both had a good idea of how the other person thought about money. My boyfriend and I went to middle school together, and both grew up in lower income backgrounds as first-generation students. We reconnected after college and have been seeing each other for almost three years now. When you’re going into a relationship with somebody, an explicit “values talk” may not necessarily come up, but you’re definitely on the lookout for what their values are and what they invest their money in. Coming from a similar background really set the tone for us, so from the very beginning I found we were compatible in our values.

Our relationship started off very slow and mindful, and we did not cut any corners. He and I previously discussed that we hadn’t learned how to communicate properly in past relationships, and we hadn’t had good examples. We knew that whatever we had been doing didn’t work. This is the healthiest, most vocal relationship I’ve had, and it definitely started out the hardest simply because we were so worried about doing everything right. Honestly at first, it did not feel natural to constantly be so open and vulnerable. But I think that’s what geared us up to have a very “unnatural” talk about finances.

It started off with our income disparity. I come from a very prideful family — we don’t talk about money and we don’t take “handouts,” so I grew up not accepting big gifts or shows of money. In the beginning of our relationship, he was very honest about the fact that he was making more money than he’d basically ever seen in his life. It was very new to him, and he never bragged about it, but I most definitely watched what he did with that money. The first thing he ever did was pay off all of his college loans and then send money to his mother, so I knew his priorities were straight. When he moved into a sleek Nolita apartment — 2BR/2BA between him and his roommate, brand-new appliances, washer and dryer — I thought to myself, “I don’t even know if we’re ever gonna be able to live together if these are what your standards are.” But even still, he was attached to his values from before all of this and kept money-saving habits like meal prepping, so I was able to be a part of that with him.

I hit a really bad rough spot in my finances one year after my graduation when my second student loan was activated. I’d not signed up for electronic billing, so they were sending paper bills to my home in Virginia. Months later I came home to about $800 of bills. I knew that waiting would hurt my credit score with the amount of time that had already passed, so I wiped my bank account, including a lot of my savings. I was an anxious mess. The ever-present tension I felt with New York City lifestyle and my income and class started seeping into other places in my life.

My anxiety persisted until one day he asked me about my wellbeing. We’d agreed that when one of us asks if the other is okay, we owe it to our relationship to be very honest. I was so embarrassed, I was crying, but I told him I’d wiped my bank account and I honestly didn’t know how I was gonna eat that week. I had -$32 to my name because I’d overdrawn my account. He never asked me if he could send me money, because he knew I’d tell him no, but he Venmo’d me $200 for the month saying, “Pay me back when you can — I’ll never ask you to. This is just to make sure that you eat, and I would love to feed you too as much as possible.” I declined the request, and he kept sending it to me, until he eventually was like, “Will you please take this money? It would make me feel better.” So I did, and of course I eventually paid him back, because money comes and money goes.

We got more comfortable having explicit conversations. We started planning our very first trip together, which I think was a nice look into future planning as well. I really appreciated that he actually cared about getting the cheapest flight, but also making sure it wasn’t a red eye that would leave us dead; getting a nice AirBnB but making sure we were getting a wonderful experience for the amount of money that we paid, rather than just balling out. He’s always been able to see everything from every angle and keep a lot of his core values present. It eventually got to the point where I started asking about his thoughts on investing, cryptocurrency, and getting out of debt. I felt very comfortable having those conversations only because of how much I admired his values and the way he truly weighs every option. He gave me deep talks and great advice about all of that.

These honest insights into each other’s values are what lead up to deciding this is someone I’d like to live with — someone I like being teammates with. He wanted Manhattan and I wanted Brooklyn, so we settled on Williamsburg. We were honest about our max budgets and priorities. Once we found the perfect place, we roughly estimated equitable rent proportions based on our post-tax incomes and other bills, like my crushing student debt. Having these talks every step of the way has been such a worthwhile exercise, and we still do check-ins to make sure neither of us feel stretched too thin. We’re just starting our financial journey together, and it’s nice to see the mindfulness we practiced from the very beginning still be present in our relationship.

*Name changed to protect privacy.

WHAT ARE YOU STIRRING UP? 😜


Summer is a great time for easy living — sun in your face, wind in your hair, nights that go on forever. But it’s an even better time to stir up some trouble. 😉

You heard us right. There’s no better time to make a splash and be unapologetically you. 

Childhood. High School. College. Our pasts have already been plotted out. But your 20s — your future — can be anything you want it to be. Throw out the manual because no one knows what’s best for you except you. 

Do what you want. Wear what you want. See whoever you want. Know your truth and speak it.

We’ve all been living with rules. Some help keep us in check and others only hold us back. You know which ones are which. 

It’s time to break them. 

Rebelling with you,
Your 20s to be team

GETTING REAL

“I was so caught up in it being my first serious relationship, and having that person I could always turn to. It was hard to look back after the fact and realize that I was unhappy, and that I wasn’t myself. But this realization is the main reason why I moved on. Now I feel more secure in myself and my identity than ever before.”
Kaitlin, 23, on a sudden breakup that worked out for the best.


“In college, my grandfather, cautioned me to ‘stay away from fancy troubles.’ But, living in London and traveling across Europe, I knew I needed just the right amount of trouble. It was ultimately in my travels that as a graphic designer I was inspired to see my designs come to life and eventually create sunglasses that truly embody the sense of possibility we all desire.”
Gabby, 25, on taking a leap of faith on her dreams.


GETTING BY

  • It’s humid. It’s sticky. Despite the sweat, what your skin needs post-sun is rehydration. Here’s a simple and refreshing DIY mask that cools you down and works wonders.
  • Living a hot girl summer? Whether you’re busy with flings or all bae-ed up, it’s first and foremost about loving yourself. “You can’t pour tea from an empty pot.” Listen to Modern Love, an NPR NYT Podcast to get inspired to love your partners, friends, families, pets and most importantly —  you.
  • Summer apartment hunting? There have been major reforms to rent-stabilization laws in NYC earlier this year. Get the scoop on how you can take advantage and save some $$. 
  • ☀️ Free stuff alert ☀️ We’re giving away a gorgeous pair of Fancy Troubles sunglasses this week — check out our Instagram to enter the giveaway!

BEEN THERE

Live out classic adventures and take advantage of these glorious summer evenings with NYC’s many outdoor movie screenings! From Casablanca to Moana, Anchorman to A Star is Born, and so much more in between, there’s something for everyone. Best of all, most are free — perfect for a casual, spontaneous summer date!

DONE THAT

For this round, our international students have asked: “when should we start thinking about post-graduation plans? How likely are we able to stay in the States?”

Vivian, a recent NYU grad tells us,

OPT is a complicated process and it can be anxiety inducing. Remember you have time and different potions. The NYU OPT page has a great calculator that gives you a timeline for when you should consider initiating the process. Also, remember your rights: you are not obligated to answer any question about your income, nationality, or citizenship.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.