THANK U, NEXT (YEAR) 🎊


Olá, salaam, namaste, 你好… hello 2019!

A new year means the rare chance for a fresh, clean slate. Our 400-year-old metropolis — home to souls from every culture and every circumstance — has truly seen it all, yet every single day, New York is a new adventure for people coming from all over the world.

Embrace the adventure.

Say goodbye to your past (thank u, next!) because the future is in your hands. Let this be a year of slaying your dragons, shooting your shot, and aiming for the sky.

Let’s kick ass,
20s to be team 🤗

GETTING REAL

“New Year’s resolutions aren’t about juice cleanses or diets. I love the idea of starting all over, but I don’t like ‘New Year, new you.’ Growing up, I struggled with OCD, anxiety, depression and anorexia. I worked hard to pull myself out of it but found myself becoming obsessed with being healthy. Our culture makes great things like group fitness, eating healthy or yoga obsessively unhealthy. This January, I want to help people set resolutions that are sustainable. We don’t need to be ‘new’ – we should already think we are enough.”
Caitie, 24, on what it actually means to get healthy.


“Being celibate was a good way of figuring out who I was. No dating, no masturbating. It wasn’t a sexual thing — it was more about my own personal relationship with God and with myself. It taught me that my worth is found in what I think of myself, not what a man thinks of me.  But part of it had nothing to do with religion, it was just me wanting to protect myself — and that’s when it became an extreme. Now, I’m learning the beauty of the in-between — there doesn’t have to be any sex, but there doesn’t have to not be any sex.”
Maggie*, 28, on 6 years of celibacy and re-defining what sex means to her now.


“I’m entering my final semester before graduation, and I’m excited to celebrate it with the community I’ve built. I had a really bumpy start where I didn’t feel connected to my school or city. It took a bit of maturing and a few people who welcomed me into their lives before I found the right support system that really helped me feel happy and fulfilled. Now, the biggest anxiety I have about post-graduation is starting all over again.”
Jessica, 22, on trusting her journey.


GETTING BY

  • Now that the holidays are winding down, here are some of our favorite recipes that take the labor out of a home cooked meal. Start meal prepping with quick, easy recipes that you can whip together in less than 5 minutes.
  • With New Year’s’ resolutions to keep up with, it’s easy to lose sight of basics like a healthy work-life balance. We found the best (and free) self-care checklist to track your priorities, whatever they may be.
  • SoulCycle? Equinox? Dogpound? Work out classes can cost an arm and a leg but if you’re looking to stay fit consistently without breaking the bank, Caitie shares with us her favorite free YouTube yoga video playlist that helps you destress, get those creative juices working, or set you up for a deep slumber – whatever health goal you have in mind.

BEEN THERE

It can be tough making resolutions. New year, same you, just a little better. For inspiration, 20s to be shares where we’ve been in 2018 and some of our resolutions in 2019.

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: “What’s the one thing you look forward to in the new year?”

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from David, who said,

I’m looking forward to new employment, a new apartment, and more shared experiences with the people I love.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR? 🔔


‘Tis the season! Whether you’re decorating a Christmas tree, lighting candles for Kwanzaa, getting cozy for Winter Solstice, or sharing latkes with family, holiday cheer is all around us. The hot cocoa is flowing, “All I Want For Christmas” is playing, and the entire city is twinkling with lights.

This city is usually about the 24/7 grind, but the holidays are a time when we can really slow down, focus on the joy in our lives, and take in all the magical moments NYC has to offer. Take the time to write a card to those who mean the most, stop and smell the pine from the Christmas tree vendors, and swap out your polished black winter coat for an ugly sweater. 

Happy Holidays from our family to yours.
Cheers,
Your 20s to be team

GETTING REAL

“I didn’t go home for Christmas last year. Usually, my family and I do Christmas carols and make monkey bread together on Christmas morning. We sit around the fireplace, tell stories, watch movies, and talk about our lives. We always listen to Nat King Cole. Last year, I went to Fairway and bought the ingredients for our monkey bread, but it wasn’t the same. My parents try to keep me in the loop by sending me photos, but it reminds me that I’m the only one living away from home.”
Maggie, 24, on spending the holidays away from home.


“When my extended family found out I was gay, my parents said ‘I don’t know if you should come home. We don’t really want to see you.’ That was a big panic moment in my life. I didn’t expect that to happen. I didn’t have a financial plan or anywhere to stay. You’re never ready to hear that your family doesn’t love you, and a big part of coming out is acknowledging that you might exit the conversation without a family. Luckily, I have a great support system here, a network of queer friends, who helped me figure out my first steps.”
Li Lu, 24, on navigating family with a gay agenda.


“This year, my husband will be spending Christmas with my family in Texas. Unlike the stereotypical south, I grew up in an Asian community with a traditional family more closed off to change and new people. Max is a born and bred New Yorker, whose family is modern and has always made me and others feel welcome in their home.  When I think about starting our own family, I’d like to combine the community of where I grew up with the openness Max and his family has shown me. I hope this Christmas, he’ll fall in love with my community too.”
Bonny, 29, on finding the true meaning of family this Christmas.


GETTING BY

  • How has your job been this past year? We’ve found some helpful questions to consider. It’s never too late to set yourself up with SMART career goals as you enter the new year (and it’s ok if you’re still figuring it out).
  • Holidays can be tiring with all the traveling, visiting family, and meeting end-of-year deadlines. It’s a race to the finish line! Prioritize sleep with the app Calm to alleviate stress and stop yourself from becoming the grinch.
  • You can save money even if you’re low on cash. Tina found an awesome tip from Reddit’s Poverty Finance — every morning, open your bank app and round your balance to the nearest $10 (or $5, or $1) to transfer into savings. You probably won’t miss the cash, plus you’ll get a psychological boost every day.

BEEN THERE

Look through your 2018 calendar and write down all the things you enjoyed doing. This journaling exercise really helped Hediya find gratitude in the little moments that helped her get through the bumpy year. We’ve got some other exercises you can enjoy too.

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: “Looking back, what’s your favorite moment of 2018?”

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from Jojo, who said,

I was lucky enough to visit Santorini with my two best friends and watched the most beautiful sunset over the white buildings of Oia. For a couple of minutes, everything around me turned a golden orange color, and it reminded me how beautiful life could be.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

WHAT’S MADE YOU STRONGER? 💪


It’s officially winter in NYC. As the weather gets colder and the streets get slushier, we quickly realize that the end of the year is nearing — but it’s not too late to make the most of these last few weeks. Between grad school rejections, failed relationships and career setbacks, we’ve all had a hard year, but came out stronger from it.

However 2018 has shaped up for you, you’re 365 days stronger and wiser than this time last year and you don’t have to wait for the new year to put it into practice. You can ask that cutie out for coffee, hit the gym 4x a week, or start reading that book you got for White Elephant last year, all before the ball drops.

You’ve got this,
Your 20s to be team 

GETTING REAL

“I was hurtful, inconsiderate, and insensitive in my relationship. I regretted breaking up with her and that hit me hard. I realized I didn’t know how to handle and process my emotions as a result of this system of toxic masculinity I was raised around. Starting a men’s group has given me the perspective of self-love and self-care in such a deep way that I never experienced before, but want to share with others.”
Sultan*, 24, on leaving behind the beta version of himself.


“The summer after graduation, I moved to New York with $5,000 and no job. I stayed in a New Jersey bedroom I found on Airbnb for about a month. When the landlord asked if I could leave, or take another room that didn’t have a bed for half the price, I got an air mattress. I wanted to live within my means, but I was living in New York City!”
Katie, 27, on making the most of a broke situation.


“The city has so much energy and can be extremely draining. I’m proud to have been born and raised here, but it’s still stressful being around so many people all the time. The constant thing that has kept me going is my violin. I found less time to play when I moved away for college and my first job, but moving back to New York City helped me reconnect with music. I even take my violin with me now when I travel for work.”
Sikander, 24, on prioritizing his happiness.


GETTING BY

  • Some of us are clueless when it comes to  finances. 401k, IRA, credit score — what do these things even mean? Worry not, we found some helpful tips on how to avoid making major money mistakes in your 20s, for even the most financially illiterate (we’re guilty too).
  • Adulthood is bumpy. Hediya couldn’t stop binge-reading Instagram sensation Mari Andrew’s book, “Am I There Yet?” It perfectly captures the 20-somethings feels through comical doodles. Plus, it makes for a great holiday gift.
  • It’s easy to splurge during the holiday season, especially when it comes to buying presents (for ourselves). Here are some quick hacks to keep your bank account smiling into the new year.

BEEN THERE

Gifts are always tough, and finding the perfect one to buy for your coworkers is never easy. For every type of manager out there, here’s our 20s to be holiday gift guide. Enjoy!

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: “What’s the most embarrassing thing that has happened to you at a holiday gathering?”

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from Admera, who said,

Winter is wedding season in India, but since we can’t travel more than 16 hours every year, my Abba (father) insists on sending pictures or videos of the “kids” to an overcrowded Whatsapp group. I’ll never forget when he sent a video of me fainting when I got my nose pierced…

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

LET’S GET THIS PUMPKIN BREAD 🍞


The air is crisp, the leaves are changing color, and there seems to be a pumpkin-spiced something around every corner.

It might not feel like it yet, but there’s plenty to be grateful for — squeezing through subway doors that just mysteriously re-opened, running into an ex on a good hair day, or finding a dollar in your jeans when you thought you were short for coffee. And it’s the early sunsets that help us appreciate the twinkling city lights more than ever.

Let’s kick off the holiday season and cheers to the little things. Raise a glass, forward us to a friend, and let’s enjoy all the magical moments that hold New Yorkers together.

Grateful as ever,
Your 20s to be team 

GETTING REAL

“The realities of US vs. THEM felt like they were here to stay. I left my position as a liaison to work at the ACLU’s Racial Justice Program. As soon as I got my hands on some police records, I was beginning to think change is actually hard to come by. I realized that there’s still so much for me to learn.”
Afraz, 23, on rolling up his sleeves to tackle the toughest issues.


If no one is going to give me a job, I’m going to make it for myself. I gathered a group of friends in my dorm and asked if they wanted to start a theater company together. We bonded quickly, but surrounded by peers who were a few years older than me, I felt behind. But through Our Time Players and our first original production, “Party Worth Crashing” reassured me that I’m doing okay.”
Colette,19, on the trying journey that led to her Off-Broadway Debut.


I was floating in a large city — I felt lost at first and didn’t know where I belonged. I was the new kid in town — that feeling really hit me when I was walking around and realized some people have been here for more than 20 years. What was I doing here? Soon enough, a local garden opened its arms and I felt like I belonged somewhere.”
Jessica, 23, planted her roots in the hustle and bustle of the Lower East Side.


GETTING BY

  • How do you balance festivities with the fam, a full-time job, demanding friendships and adult responsibilities all in one holiday season? And can you even do it without getting burned out? Our favorite YouTuber Anna Akana reassures us that it’s possible.
  • It’s easy to have a love/hate relationship with NYC, from struggling to make rent to riding the MTA. Bruh, it’s rough. But this city has become our home and there’s 101 things to be grateful for this season.
  • We’re tired of being asked, “What are you bringing to the potluck?” We’ve got you covered, though. Here’s the ultimate guide to hosting Friendsgiving in a tiny apartment.

BEEN THERE

Head to DeKalb Market Hall, inside City Point Brooklyn, for some of the finest food NYC has to offer. With 40 vendors and a Trader Joe’s, you can impress any holiday visitor or find the supplies you need for a Turkey Day dinner — just ask Tina, who got her Friendsgiving chicken from Foragers Rotisserie last year (it was delicious, BTW). While you’re there, make sure to check out the rest of City Point — with a Target, Century21, and Alamo Drafthouse, you can make a day of it.

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: “How did you get involved in your community?”

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from Jojo, who said,

Doing sports as a young adult can be expensive and difficult to make time for. I wanted to get back into figure skating, so I started volunteer coaching at my local rink on weekends and was allowed to practice on ice during off-hours.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

MAKE YOUR MARK ☑️


The one big perk of being in your 20s? The right to vote. The right to stand up for your political beliefs — no matter what they may be — and have your voice heard.

As young adults living in this wild world, it’s hard to know what the future holds. If you have the chance to make your mark, don’t pass it up. Casting your vote today is the easiest way to shape the world around you.

If you’re reading this and you haven’t voted yet, get your butt out there! We’ll be right there in line with you.

See you at the polls,
Your 20s to be team 
P.S. You know what’s even more impactful than voting? Encouraging your friends to vote too. Send a text, shoot a note, or forward us as a reminder to a friend.

GETTING REAL

I’ve always had a passion for local government. That’s why I decided to run for office. Announcing my campaign was a big deal – you get really excited beforehand and you hear some really positive, touching, inspiring things. But I never anticipated the vulnerability. Everybody is allowed to give you feedback because everybody has a vote. That’s something you have to get comfortable with. You can’t do it alone. You have to ask people for their support and for their vote. You have to ask them for money, and those are things that I’m not used to doing.”
Dylan, 24, on running for local office and the vulnerability that came with it.


There’s a lot of anger, especially among women, and we see that with #MeToo or Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination. But it makes me hopeful knowing people are seeing what’s happening and recognize there’s work to be done. It’s easy to feel that politics is not a space for us but I encourage people to think about all the things you do on a day-to-day basis and how they’re informed by decisions of people representing you. Everyone has something that they care about that feels personal to them. That ladders up.”
Nieve, 23, on how to be the change you wish to see in the world.


I’m a communist. I’m a Marxist-Leninist, specifically. Right after Donald Trump had been inaugurated, I had been very frustrated with the Democrats and the 2016 democratic process. I was all about Bernie Sanders at the time, but we did everything right and the whole system turned on us. Everything was designed to stop us from getting the tiniest concession. It was eventually clear to me that was some sort of structural explanation as to why the system reacted the way it did. I realized something like universal healthcare, socialized medicine, free college tuition — all that stuff sounds good but I don’t want it under a capitalist system.”
Trevor, 21, on ushering in a new world order.


GETTING BY

  • It’s voting day, but you still may have some last minute questions from getting to/from polls, who’s running, and the way the ballots are measured. Curbed New York has got you covered with the basics.
  • Social media and the 24-hour political news cycle can be really stressful. If you need to cope, Headspace is offering a “politics pack” for the midterm elections that comprises of meditation resources to calm your mind.
  • Even the smallest actions can bring the biggest change to your community. Make your mark by volunteering at local NYC organizations and learning the ways you can get involved.

BEEN THERE

International Center of Photography
Performance – Optics: Visual Culture And Electoral Politics
November 6, 2018 from 7 to 10 PM

You voted. Now what? The International Center of Photography (ICP) is hosting a special election night program with writer Jillian Steinhauer and artist Daniel Bejar in discussion about the impact of visual culture on electoral politics. Artist Amy Khoshbin will perform her work, You Never Know, a political speech turned into a cathartic rap performance.
The night will wrap with a watch-party, cash bar, and DJ! If that’s not much of an incentive, the 20s to be team will be there too 🙂
RSVP  Optics: Visual Culture and Electoral Politics

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: What’s one superpower you have and what’s one you want to have?

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from Jojo, who said,

Teleportation, hands down. Being an immigrant and having friends and family halfway across the world, I’d give anything to be able to visit them at the blink of an eye and be back by lunchtime.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

READY TO FACE YOUR FEARS? 👻


Every Halloween, our childhood fears roam the streets — whether it’s spiders, ghosts, or the impending nuclear apocalypse.

We might be all grown up now, but our 20s can go from dream to nightmare in a New York minute. After all, the city is a breeding ground for a whole new set of fears: getting ghosted by a hot date, discovering bed bugs in your apartment, encountering “train traffic” (whatever that might mean)… the list goes on.

Whatever your fears are — on All Hallow’s Eve or any other day — you don’t have to face them alone. We can’t wave a wand and make your nightmares go away, but we can overcome any misfortune together.

Much love,
Hediya, Jojo, Julia, and Tina
P.S. We’re here for your friends too. If you like what you’re reading, forward us to someone who will like it as much as you do!

GETTING REAL

A month after I accepted a full-time offer from my internship, my manager and mentor told me she was leaving the company. My heart sank, I felt like I was lied to. I was 21 years old, straight out of college with a liberal arts degree, and suddenly I was the lead on calls to our counterparts in Europe. My director told me to go home when I was there late, but if I didn’t do the work, who else would? It was a total fake-it or make-it situation. I had to really be on my toes. But I learned a lot during that time span, like how to interact with your superiors, how to problem solve in an assertive way, how to set deadlines and push back when they’re not realistic. How to say no.”
Eric*, on navigating his first full-time job with no guide and no map.


I noticed I had some bites on my arm, but I didn’t think much of it. It all felt real when my roommate and I captured a bed bug in a glass. I cried as I went through a checklist of ways I had to clean. The exterminator came at 5:30 a.m. Monday morning. Even though the bed bugs were gone, I can never go back to normal. I didn’t want to be home anymore — I didn’t feel safe there. Even when I moved, I didn’t have much around the house and made sure furniture never touched the walls. It’s hard to find somewhere you truly call home in NYC and having bed bugs made it impossible to ever get comfortable.”
Kavish, on his war against bed bugs.


“The night before my 24th birthday, I broke down. When I was 21, adulthood seemed bright, and new, and shiny. I didn’t know then that my job would be completely wrong for me, that my relationship would drain my energy and slowly fall apart, that I would neglect my mental health and fall into seasonal depression. In adulthood, people expect you to have it all together, even when you’re always one wrong step away from train wreck. But at 24, I felt a new kind of confidence I didn’t realize I was missing all those years ago, at 21.”
Cleo*, on saying goodbye to her naiveté.


GETTING BY

  • Forget turning lemons into lemonade — The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*** by Mark Manson, the ultimate anti-self-help self-help book, teaches you how to live with the lemons.
  • The best way to clear your head after a bed bug encounter, or any stressful life event, is to jam out. Kavish shared a playlist of songs that armed him for battle against the critters and dealing with the feels of post-grad life.
  • Satisfy your craving for everything scary by tuning into the NoSleep Podcast. The narrators retell their favorite stories from Reddit’s /r/nosleep to really put you on the edge of your seat. Dim the lights, curl up in a blanket, and get ready for a long night ahead of you.

BEEN THERE

If you’re looking for drinks, food, good movies and great feels, Syndicated is the place to be. Located off the Morgan stop of the L train in the heart of Bushwick, the nondescript Art Deco building houses it all. The movie theater specializes in older movies, including seasonal favorites like “A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)” to classics like “2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).” Don’t worry about sneaking in snacks since they have a full food and bar menu inside the theater, with waiter service continuing through the movie. Don’t forget to buy your tickets in advance as they sell out quickly. Those looking for a more social experience can order their food and drinks at the bar, while watching movies being projected against the wall of the restaurant. 

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: If you could be anyone else for a day, who would it be and why?

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from Sikander, who said,

Joshua Bell, a phenomenal violinist who recorded several movie soundtracks (I love playing film music). He gets to travel the world to perform, he’s super passionate about music education, and he lives in my dream location of Gramercy Park.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

IT’S OK NOT TO BE OK 🌱


Summer is officially over and fall is in full swing, but aren’t you already looking forward to another break? The endless opportunities, 24-hour nightlife, and something around every obscure corner can be exciting — and exhausting.

Especially with the weather changes and seasonal affective disorder (SAD) settling in, it’s important to take some time for yourself. Seriously, you’re not alone — World Mental Health Day falls on October 10th every year for a reason. Whether it’s curling up with a good read and a hot apple cider or diving into the latest issue of 20s to be, we’ve got you covered.  

Much love,
Hediya, Jojo, Julia, and Tina
P.S. What do you think about our newsletter so far? Let us know what you think in our feedback survey. Or, drop us a line at hey@20stobe.com.

GETTING REAL

I was at a crossroads — I’d just quit my job, broken up with my boyfriend and watched one of my best friends suddenly move away. Going on a roadtrip with my friend seemed like a good way to handle it. We’re frugal people, so we slept in tents, cooked food from Walmart on a portable stove, and drank apple cider vinegar for our immune system. But I spent most of the trip sick — I’d push myself to keep going to the next destination, and my health finally took a turn for the better when I let myself slow down. As the sun set over the Grand Canyon, I cried and realized despite the challenges of the trip and the transitions, I would survive this and come out stronger.”
Meenakshi, on dealing with transitions and anxiety while on the road.


“‘Ew, what’s in this drink? Are those turds?‘ That’s what a coworker said when one of our clients sent us bubble tea samples. Another client for a dim sum restaurant sent us an item on their menu: chicken feet. A colleague left it on someone’s desk as a prank, and when she saw it, she threw a tantrum — tossed it on the floor and everything. That was really hurtful since I associate dim sum and chicken feet to my family and culture.  Sure, my coworkers and I share details from our lives, joke about bad dates. But as one of three people of color in the office, these microaggressions make me lose respect for my coworkers.”
Emma*, on being part-Taiwanese in an all-white office.


“Teaching yoga was an accident in the making. My friend recommended I start working at a fitness studio and I dove right into training to become a yoga teacher. It was the most intensive two months I’ve ever had, but in the course of training, I was able to reflect on my life and relationships, and I reconnected with myself — both physically and emotionally. My yoga teacher told me that trainings come at the right time in peoples’ life, and being surrounded by a community of friendly people living outside the traditional 9 to 5 lifestyle really helped ease my post-graduation anxiety, especially living in the city.”
Ali*, on finding her sanctuary at a Brooklyn yoga studio.


GETTING BY

  • In the city that never sleeps, it’s easy to forget to to take time for yourself. Our favorite YouTuber, Anna Akana, shares some advice on how to stay cool, calm and collected.
  • Need to slow down? Hediya started using the meditation app, Stop, Breathe & Think, which helps calm her mind.
  • Trust us, every New Yorker has their gripes about the MTA.  It gets better with the app, Exit Strategy. It figures out the exact subway car you should ride to help you get to where you need to be quicker, while spending as little time underground as possible.

BEEN THERE

Jojo’s favorite hang-out lately is the new Domino Park overlooking the East River — just steps off the South Williamsburg stop of the NYC Ferry. Either join a game of pick-up beach volleyball or grab your skateboard and hit the ramps. Or, if you’re anything like Jojo, bring a blanket, and lounge on the grass — the park always seems to be ripe with good looking sunbathers, and who knows who you might meet? Plus, if you can rip your gaze away from the waterfront, the solemn remains of the former Domino Sugar Factory looms in the background — a haunting reminder of a different Brooklyn.

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: What’s the bravest thing you did this summer?

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from AZ, who said,

Back in May, I had no clue what I wanted, despite having just graduated with my master’s. So, three days later, I packed my bags and went to the Middle East for the summer, hoping to find some answers for myself. I’m still figuring it out, but the trip helped me find what path I see myself on moving forward.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.

IT’S ABOUT TO GET REAL ⚡


Let’s be candid.

20s to be started as a runner-up graduation speech, evolved into conversations about the college-adulthood transition, before giving voice to a new generation of 20-somethings.

It’s fitting that we’re launching our first issue in the fall, the season of transitions. Going back to school? Starting a new gig? Busting out your new wardrobe? Whatever it is, we’re here for you.

Let us know what you think in our feedback survey. Or, drop us a line at hey@20stobe.com.

Much love,
Hediya, Jojo, Julia, and Tina ✨

GETTING REAL

Sometimes I wonder, ‘Oh crap, am I doing the right thing?‘ I decided when I graduated that I wanted to build a start-up. I know a lot of people who have dope jobs but hate it, and that was a huge influence — I didn’t want to end up unhappy about work. But everything up until my launch date was pretty bad. A lot of the advice I was given about entrepreneurship was out of date. I didn’t know what I was doing. But you’re running experiments, right? Not everything will work. When people tell me to keep it up and they really like my projects, that reassures me to keep on going.”
Vidy, on building his own path, overcoming roadblocks and following his dreams.


“I started going to The Strand alone when he broke up with me. He had controlled every aspect of my life before that and I had no idea what to do with myself. The bookstore became my refuge because it can be swarming with people, yet I can still find a quiet corner to absorb my surroundings. I was in the poetry section once when something fell out of one of the books I was reading. There was a poem inside, dated June 1963.  It was signed, “with lots of love, Jim and Mary.” I took the note home with me and I have it to this day. That’s when I remembered I’m not alone.”
Admera, on finding clarity in the most unlikely of places.


When I graduated, I saw I had $19K in student debt and burst into tears. But that feeling lit a fire in me. I had four rules: budget out of your salary to pay off interest, think long term, forget immediate pleasures, and check Reddit’s /r/personal finance to stay motivated. I moved back in with my parents, I wasn’t getting myself into credit card debt, I was putting most of my income into student loan payments. I increased payment into my 401K when I realized my employer matches — out of sight, out of mind. When I finally paid it all off two years after graduation, I felt drained — and elated.”
Beebo*, on paying off her student loans two years after graduating.


GETTING BY

  • It’s hard to survive in NYC with an entry level salary, but you can still have fun with some simple budgeting tricks.
  • Getting by is all about the hacks. These are our favorite subreddits for whipping our lives (back) in order.
  • It’s not always easy to get out of bed and go to work everyday. Lily Singh’s video, My Secret to Success, hit home. Her secret to breaking out of the mundane 9-5 routine? Get out of your comfort zone!

BEEN THERE

It’s hard to find a quiet place in the city to just relax and get away. Hediya found her sanctuary at Elizabeth Street Garden, a peaceful community garden tucked away near Little Italy, where she’ll plug into her favorite podcast or just people watch.

DONE THAT

For this round, we asked ourselves: What was your craziest apartment hunt in NYC?

Our favorite, and most relatable response, was from Julia, who said,

A broker once called a five-story walk-up 25 minutes from a subway a free gym membership.

Got a burning question to ask? Need some advice? Ask, and we will answer!

Hit us up for questions, comments, or whatever strikes your fancy at hey@20stobe.com.